Business Best Practices Library


Business Best Practices, Processes, Tools and Templates from the World’s Leading Management Experts

Our resident experts and network of global thought leaders have assembled a portfolio of free online digital tools and templates that span all key business processes and functions, from strategy to execution. Create a board focused on any one of these processes or mix and match tools to create your own custom collaborative environment and dashboards for your team, department, or organization.

Business Strategy - Best Practice Tools & Templates

  • 2 X 2 Matrix

    A 2×2 Matrix is a tool that can be used to think about the relationships between two different variables. In business strategy, two variables are typically selected that intersect that allow for an understanding of four unique dimensions related to each quadrant of the related 2×2 matrix.

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  • ADL Matrix

    An ADL Matrix is a strategy that can be used to help an organization understand its competitive position in the market. To effectively use this matrix, senior leaders need to consider: 1) the amount of influence the organization has in the market, and 2) the age of the industry. The various combinations of these two factors produce a matrix that will indicate where the company sits.

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  • Affinity Diagrams

    An Affinity Diagram is a tool and technique widely used in organizations that solicits and categorizes a large set of seemingly disparate ideas identified during a brainstorming session into natural groupings.

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  • Baker’s 4 Strategies of Influence

    Baker’s 4 Strategies of Influence are four different persuasion methods that can be used for a variety of purposes. Baker’s strategies are broken down into two main styles and two approaches. Push styles are more assertive methods for proving a point. By contrast, pull styles involve using more subtle persuasion tactics.

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  • Balanced Scorecard

    A Balanced Scorecard is a model that summarizes an organization’s high-level strategic goals, initiatives designed to reach those goals, and metrics, or key performance indicators, that monitor success over time, and shows how they are connected to the mission, vision, and core values of the organization. It is a strategic planning tool used ubiquitously in organizational management that clearly and concisely communicates what the organization has set out to achieve and how it proposes to do it.

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  • Benchmarking

    Benchmarking is the process of comparing an organizations performance to those of the top standards in the industry, which can be another organization within the industry or an organization in another industry that operates at the level that the industry is hoping to achieve.

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  • Blue Ocean Strategy

    When the market has reached a peak, organizations create strategies to remain competitive in the mature environment. A Blue Ocean Strategy takes a slightly different approach by providing a means for an organization to create a new market that is completely devoid of competition.

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  • Bowman Strategy Clock

    The Bowman Strategy Clock is a powerful strategy positioning tool used to gather information on a company’s market position relative to the competition. Bowman’s Strategy Clock shows how product positioning is based on two dimensions: price and perceived value.

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  • Build-Measure-Learn Feedback Loop

    The Build-Measure-Learn Feedback Loop is a process that translates potentially risky ideas or strategies that top management is not completely certain about into beneficial knowledge that can be used to promote progress in the organization.

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  • Business Model Canvas

    The Business Model Canvas is a template for developing a new business model or clarifying the elements of an existing business model. It is a “canvas” or chart that describes a firm’s value proposition, infrastructure, partnerships, value proposition, customers, finances and other strategic and operational dimensions of the business.

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  • CAGE Distance Framework

    The CAGE Distance Framework identifies Cultural, Administrative, Geographic and Economic (CAGE) differences or distances between countries that companies should address when crafting international strategies. It was developed to offer businesses a way to evaluate countries in terms of the “distances” between them.

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  • Competitive Analysis

    Competitive Analysis is the process of identifying your company’s competitors and evaluating their strategies in order to reveal their relative strengths and weaknesses and discover opportunities for how to position your company to achieve competitive advantage.

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  • Competitive Landscape Analysis

    Competitive Landscape Analysis is an investigation that is completed when an organization is interested in knowing who their competitors are and their relative position in the market. More than just identifying competition, a Competitive Landscape Analysis involves determining the strengths and weaknesses of the competition as well as their strategies, services, products and change management plans.

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  • Contingency Planning

    Contingency Planning is a methodical and systematic process for preparing for and developing a course of action in the face of unexpected events that can adversely impact your business.

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  • Core Competence Analysis

    Core Competence Analysis is the process of identifying a company’s fundamental strengths and attributes that are unique and serve to differentiate it from its competitors, as well as how to capitalize on these core capabilities to build sustained competitive advantage.

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  • Critical Success Factors

    Critical Success Factors are the core actions that underlie an organization’s strategic objectives that must be accomplished at the highest level possible in order to achieve the overall goals and mission of the organization.

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  • Discovery Driven Planning

    Discovery Driven Planning is a business process tool that distinguishes between traditional business planning and the planning required for new business ventures. Whereas traditional planning processes focus on clear goals with specific projections, Discovery Driven Planning can be used for internal corporate ventures and start-ups where the future is highly uncertain and contains many assumptions.

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  • Economic Value Added

    Economic Value Added (EVA), which can also be referred to as Economic Profit, is the measure of a company’s financial performance based on its residual wealth. The residual wealth is calculated by deducting its cost of capital from its operating profit, adjusted for taxes on a cash basis.

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  • First Mover Advantage

    The First Mover Advantage describes the dominant position held by the organization who puts a product or service on the market before their competitors. Advantage is achieved because the organization is able to establish themselves as the originator of the product or service and  institute customer loyalty before competitors enter the marketplace.

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  • Five Forces Model

    The Five Forces Model, also called Porter’s Five Forces Framework, is a tool for analyzing a business’ competition and competitive environment. The model looks at five forces within any industry to determine the state of the competitive the environment and as a result, the implications for how profitable the industry could be and business strategies for driving success.

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  • Force Field Analysis

    Force Field Analysis is a framework for analyzing and responding to the positive and negative factors that impact a business situation, strategic issue, or business opportunity.

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  • Gap Analysis

    Gap Analysis is a method of determining how an organization’s current state differs from its desired future state and the steps it needs to take to achieve desired performance results.

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  • GE McKinsey 9-Box Matrix

    The GE McKinsey 9-Box Matrix is a tool that can be used by an organization to prioritize investment among business units. More specifically, the GE McKinsey 9-Box Matrix offers a systematic approach to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a business unit along two dimensions: how attractive the unit is and the unit’s competitive strength within the industry.

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  • Go To Market Strategy

    A Go To Market Strategy is a strategic plan that organizations use to outline how they will bring a new product, service, or business model to market. This strategy is created with the intention of attaining competitive advantage in the industry by improving the overall product experience of the customer (e.g., reasonable price, high quality materials, etc.).

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  • Hambrick & Frederickson’s Strategy Diamond

    Hambrick & Frederickson’s Strategy Diamond clearly outlines an organization’s plan for growth. Specifically, this model is an organizational tool that includes all the important information for the organization’s strategy. Using the information that is included in the diamond, business leaders will be sure they are considering all the important details when making decisions.

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  • Hedgehog Model

    The Hedgehog Model is a corporate leadership concept outlined in Jim Collins’ 2001 book called Good to Great. The idea stems from an ancient Greek poem in which a cunning fox tries and continually fails to eat a hedgehog who is always able to escape at the last moment by rolling into a ball. Collins describes how companies who are more like the hedgehog are more likely to succeed, because they focus on one thing and do that one thing well.

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  • Hook Model of Behavioral Design

    The Hook Model of Behavioral Design helps product manufacturers design products that create habit-forming behavior in users via a looping cycle that consists of the following four steps: Trigger, Action, Variable Reward and Continued Investment.

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  • Hoshin Planning System

    The Hoshin Planning System is a seven-step procedure that outlines how to implement business strategy. More specifically, this system aims to align the goals that the organization is trying to achieve with its strategy and the resources that are available within the company.

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  • Kay’s Distinctive Capabilities Framework

    Kay’s Distinctive Capabilities Framework is a strategy that outlines a way for an organization to highlight its unique features (or distinctive capabilities) that give the organization its competitive advantage. This helps the company to be more prominent in the industry and beat its competitors.

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  • Key Outcome Indicators

    Key Outcome Indicators help measure the overall performance and success of an organization. Many companies use Key Outcome Indicators across departments to measure the success of specific groups and the organization as a whole.

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  • Kotler's Five Product Levels Model

    Kotler’s Five Product Levels Model provides a way to show the different levels of need customers have for a product, such as: Core benefit, Generic Product, Expected Product, Augmented Product and Potential Product.

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  • Kotler’s Pricing Strategies

    Kotler’s Pricing Strategies, also know at the Nine Quality-Pricing Strategy, consists of a matrix of nine pricing options. The goal is the assist companies to position products based on their perceived place in the market relative to the competition. This model relates pricing to the quality delivered.

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  • Lafley & Martin’s Five Step Strategy Model

    Lafley & Martin’s Five Step Strategy Model requires a thorough understanding of the organization as well as the industry it resides in. This is because this model involves answering a series of questions which are designed to break business down into five options to be successful.

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  • McKinsey 7S Model

    The McKinsey 7S Model has stood the test of time as a framework to ensure that all parts of an organization work in harmony. The most common uses of the framework are to facilitate organizational change, implement a new strategy, identify areas that may change in the future, and to facilitate the merger of organizations.

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  • McKinsey’s Seven Degrees of Freedom for Growth

    McKinsey’s Seven Degrees of Freedom for Growth is a strategy tool that helps companies realize the strategic opportunities to grow.

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  • Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A)

    Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) is a general term used to describe the consolidation of companies by various means, such as mergers, acquisitions, tender offers, consolidations, purchase of assets or management acquisitions.

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  • Mission Statement

    A Mission Statement defines the fundamental purpose for why a company exists and may include aspects of the organization’s scope and values.

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  • Mullin's Seven Domains Model

    Mullin’s Seven Domains Model was created for entrepreneurs interested in starting their own business as well as being a helpful guide for companies working to decide whether to pursue new products.

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  • OGSM Framework

    The OGSM Framework is a method that helps to guide organizations from the planning to the implementation phase of the business strategy development process. OGSM is an acronym that stands for Objective, Goals, Strategies, and Measures.

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  • Ohmae's 3 C’s Model

    Ohmae’s 3 C’s Model focuses on 3 key success factors, namely The Corporation, The Consumer and The Competition, which form a strategic triangle. The 3 factors must be in balance for a business to have sustainable competitive advantage.

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  • Partner Relationship Management

    Partner Relationship Management (PRM) is a term used for the strategies employed to streamline business practices between companies and the partners help develop, distribute or sell their products and services. Partner Relationship Management systems often include software that is cloud-based and contains tools that allow partners to manage revenue, sales metrics, and leads.

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  • PEST Analysis

    PEST Analysis is a standard business practice of evaluating the Political, Economic, Social, and Technological dimensions that can impact your organization and its markets. Its purpose is to identify potential threats and opportunities coming from the external environment over which the organization has no control but must anticipate when making strategic decisions.

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  • PESTLE Analysis

    A PESTLE Analysis is a tool used to analyze the outside influences on a potential product, project or service prior to launching it. PESTLE is an acronym, an extension of a PEST Analysis, which stands for Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legal and Environmental factors. When completed, it provides an overall picture of the external environment to help with strategic planning and decision-making.

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  • Porter’s Diamond

    Porter’s Diamond explains the factors that influence how competitive an industry in one country would be internationally. This model specifically names firm strategy, structure & rivalry, factor conditions, demand conditions, and related and supporting industries that might be specific to one country as conditions that differentially exist in certain countries and not others.

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  • Portfolio Management

    Portfolio Management centralizes the management of all projects across an organization and their associated components, such as goals, resources, staffing, timeline, and budgets.

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  • Purpose Statement

    The Purpose Statement defines the basic customer needs the organization exists to fulfill. Not associated with a definitive end point, time frame, or deadline, Purpose Statements essentially answer the question “what business are we in?” in a broad yet focused way.

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  • Pyramid of Purpose

    The Pyramid of Purpose is a strategic tool that can be used to plan and effectively communicate a business strategy across all levels of an organization. Each level of the pyramid represents a different question about the strategy that an employee could ask.

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  • Scenario Planning

    Scenario Planning is a process for businesses to think about and plan for the future. Also known as scenario development or scenario analysis, the process typically involves identify external trends and disruptors, exploring how the future could unfold, what the consequences would be for the business, and how to respond.

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  • Simonson and Rosen’s Influence Mix

    Simonson and Rosen’s Influence Mix is a tool to help marketers think about the impact of social media sites on customers’ purchasing decisions, in order to help them develop a successful marketing strategy.

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  • SMART Performance Metrics

    SMART Performance Metrics is a tool used to create criteria to help improve the chances of an organization’s business success. It is an acronym that many businesses use for different purposes, from goal-setting to performance reviews to evaluating innovation.

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  • SMART(ER) Goals

    SMART(ER) Goals stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, Time-Bound, Evaluate and Re-Do. Setting SMART(ER) Goals helps to clarify ideas, focus individual or team efforts and efficiently use time and resources.

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  • SOAR

    SOAR stands for strengths, opportunities, aspirations and results and is a strategic planning tool used as an alternative to a SWOT analysis. It uses “appreciative inquiry” principles to identify an organization’s strengths, opportunities, and ambitions and reframes the negative connotations associated with weaknesses and threats included in a SWOT analysis to avoid resistance and mobilize commitment towards the organization’s desired future state.

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  • Strategic Goals

    Strategic Goals are the high-level, overarching objectives that an organization sets out to achieve over a set timeframe. They articulate what the organization plans to do to fulfill its mission and vision, and they form the foundation for designing and implementing strategic initiatives, which are the actual projects and programs that get implemented in service of accomplishing the Strategic Goals.

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  • Strategy Map

    A Strategy Map is a clear visual representation of the major strategic objectives of an organization, usually based on a framework or model like the balanced scorecard. This representation is useful for communicating the organization’s strategy in a digestible way to employees at all levels of the organization.

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  • Strategy Roadmap

    A Strategy Roadmap, also known as a Strategic Roadmap, is a visual depiction of where the organization currently is and where it would like to go in the future, including a plan to get from the current to the desired state.

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  • Strategy Uncertainty Map

    A Strategy Uncertainty Map is a model that is used to navigate uncertain situations inevitably encountered during the strategy or innovation process. The uncertainty map explains why uncertainty occurs, how it will change throughout the strategy or innovation process, and how project leaders can harness uncertainty to make the most informed decisions.

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  • SWOT Analysis

    SWOT Analysis is a strategic planning tool that explores an organization’s internal and external environment, including strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.

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  • TOWS Matrix

    The TOWS Matrix is a tool that can be used to compare and contrast different strategies to select the best one for the organization. The matrix breaks down the strategies according to internal (Strengths and Weaknesses) and external (Opportunities and Threats) factors.

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  • Triple Bottom Line

    The Triple Bottom Line is a framework for measuring an organization’s performance along three dimensions: people, planet, and profit, or the “3 Ps.” A theory of corporate social responsibility, businesses that employ the Triple Bottom Line take responsibility for the impact they have on people and the planet, not solely focus on profits, by making the well-being of their employees, communities, and the environment a core component of its strategy and vision for long-term sustainability.

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  • USP Analysis

    The Unique Selling Proposition or USP Analysis is a strategy that is implemented to highlight the special features of a product that is marketed to the organization’s clients. Specifically, this analysis focuses on the product’s elements that distinguish the organization from competitors in the industry.

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  • Value Chain Analysis

    Value Chain Analysis is a method that can be used to identify all the tasks related to the creation and delivery of a product, service, or process. Value Chain Analysis process also helps determine the source of the organization’s competitive advantage.

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  • Value Disciplines Model

    The Value Disciplines Model suggests that in order to be viable a business must be successful in three key areas: Customer Intimacy, Product Leadership, and Operational Excellence. In addition, if an organization wants to become a market leader, it must excel in one of these areas.

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  • Value Net Model

    The Value Net Model provides an alternative view of competition. That is, instead of viewing competition as an impediment to profits, competition can be viewed as a beneficial tool to the organization.

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  • Values Statement

    Values Statements articulate an organization’s core beliefs and principles that drive performance and behavior. They contain the essential and enduring tenets of an organization.

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  • Vision Statement

    Vision Statements define and describe the vibrant future an organization wishes to create and achieve. The intention of a vision is to guide, inspire, and motivate people to reach the desired end state for the organization.

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  • VRIO Analysis

    VRIO Analysis is an internal corporate investigation method used to identify and evaluate resources, with the goal of increasing competitive advantage. VRIO is an acronym for four criteria that are important for a company to consider: Value, Rarity, Imitability, and Organization.

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  • Weisbord's Six-Box Model

    Weisbord’s Six-Box Model was developed to uncover organizational issues that get overlooked by senior management. It provides a structured way for management to uncover issues without the task feeling too overwhelming.

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Marketing - Best Practice Tools & Templates

  • 7 Cs Compass Model

    7 Cs Compass Model is a template that can be used to explain the reason an organization is experiencing success or failure in the market. In contrast to other marketing models, the 7 Cs Compass Model considers both the marketing strategies as well as the segment to which the strategies are being targeted. The seven Cs are Corporation, Commodity, Cost, Communication, Channel, Consumer and Circumstances.

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  • AIDA Marketing Model

    The AIDA Marketing Model is a widely used framework to explain the cognitive steps a customer takes when determining whether or not to purchase a product, and the steps an organization needs to take to navigate the customer towards purchasing the product or service being offered. More specifically, the AIDA Model provides guidance on the best places and the best medium to communicate the value of the product or service to potential customers. AIDA is an acronym whose letters stand for: Awareness, Interest, Desire, and Action.

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  • BCG Matrix

    The BCG Matrix is a tool used by organizations to assess the value of the products that they offer in terms of their growth (i.e., how desirable the product on the market will be) and market share (i.e., competitive advantage). Using the model, an organization can determine which products are a worthwhile investment of company money and employee time and effort.

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  • Brand Identity Prism

    The Brand Identity Prism, developed by Jean-Noel Kapferer, is a framework for defining a company’s brand identity that includes six elements: physique, personality, culture, relationship, reflection, and self-image. Expressing the brand consistently across all six elements creates brand coherence, which strengthens the connection between the brand and the consumer.

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  • Brand Pyramid

    A Brand Pyramid is a diagram that shows the five cumulative stages consumers go through with a brand, starting with presence, and then moving on to relevance, performance, advantage, and bonding. Shown as an inverted pyramid, the higher one goes, the greater brand loyalty he or she demonstrates, and the greater revenue potential there is for the company. As a fundamental tool of a broader marketing strategy, the goal is to move as many consumers to the top of the inverted brand pyramid as possible.

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  • Closed Loop Customer Feedback

    Closed Loop Customer Feedback is a systematic practice of promptly responding to customer needs and sharing the customer’s feedback with appropriate stakeholders in order to identify and make improvements to the customer experience and organizational performance.

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  • Content Marketing

    Content Marketing is a widely used, targeted marketing strategy that is created with the intention of formulating and continuously circulating unique content about a product or service that is pertinent to the customer. By emphasizing information that is truly important to the customer, content marketing is believed to increase the amount of profits attained from a good or service.

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  • Content Marketing Metrics

    Content Marketing Metrics describe the measures used to assess how well certain marketing strategies are performing.

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  • Customer Experience Maturity Model

    The Customer Experience Maturity Model describes a process that organizations can go through to better center their business on the needs of their customers. The experience maturity model provides guidance on how to align all of the organization’s employees, procedures and technologies toward providing the best experience and products to customers. The 7 steps of the Customer Experience Maturity Model include: Initiate, Radiate, Align, Optimize, Nurture, Engage, and Attain Lifetime Customers.

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  • Customer Relationship Management (CRM)

    Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is a system for making and maintaining close relationships with customers. This system allows the company to keep track of a customer’s prior history with the organization, the status of any current orders as well as incomplete service issues.

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  • Customer Journey Mapping

    Customer Journey Mapping is the process of illustrating a customer’s experience with your company or a product, from the very first touch point to becoming a loyal customer. Customer Journey Maps are based on a particular customer persona, with a defined set of attributes, motivations, and emotions. The map is used to identify potential challenges the customer faces as they interact with the company through the different stages of product research, comparison, selection, and renewal. This can reveal opportunities to better serve the customer, which in turn can increase sales and loyalty.

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  • Digital Marketing

    Digital Marketing refers to any means of marketing a product or service using an electronic device or the internet. For instance, Digital Marketing can refer to the use of search engines, social media or e-mail campaigns to connect with current and potential clients.

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  • Environmental Scanning

    Environmental Scanning is the systematic process of collecting quantitative and qualitative data on the current state of an organization’s market environment, including technology trends, customer needs, political shifts, economic variables, and environmental issues.

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  • Ethnographic Research

    Ethnographic Research, a qualitative research method, is the practice of discovering and describing the culture of a group through observation, interviewing, and making inferences based on what the ethnographer perceives. Elements of Ethnographic Research design are frequently used in organizations for understanding customer behavior and assessing organizational effectiveness and culture.

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  • Four Ps Marketing Mix Model

    The Four P’s Marketing Mix Model describes the four elements (Product, Price, Promotion and Place) that best capture the distinctive selling points of the product or service that the organization is offering. These elements can then be used to develop a marketing strategy for the product or service that best fits the needs of your clients. More specifically, this model is useful because it allows your marketing team to easily see what elements of the “marketing mix” should be highlighted as the product or service is put on the market.

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  • Market Sizing

    Market Sizing is the process of estimating the size of a market and evaluating market trends to enable a company to make sound strategic decisions about its product investments and accurately predict growth targets.

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  • Net Promoter Score

    Net Promoter Score (NPS) is a measure of your customers’ willingness to recommend your company’s products and services to a friend or colleague, and is a reliable and widely used indicator of customer loyalty and satisfaction.

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  • Personas

    A Persona is marketing tool used to project and illustrate, in graphic form, an individual’s lifestyle habits, preferences, motivations, demographic background, and other key personality traits that are based on customer research and are intended to represent a broader customer segment of great importance to the company. They are used to deepen companies’ understanding of their buyers, and determine how marketing strategies are developed.

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  • Positioning

    Positioning is the process and strategy used to differentiate a company’s brand, products, and services from its competitors and ensure consumers perceive them that way. It involves the methodical identification, effective communication, and influence on consumer perception of a brand’s unique identity and place in the market.

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  • Segmentation

    Market Segmentation is the process of dividing a market into specific customer segments or groups that are defined around a common yet distinguishable set of characteristics, and helps marketers isolate which target customers will be positively influenced by a potential marketing or promotional strategy.

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  • STP Model

    The Segmentation Targeting and Positioning (STP) Model is a marketing framework that can be used to prioritize the potential new markets that your products or services can be advertised to. More specifically, the STP Model aids the marketing team in developing personalized marketing materials that communicate the value and benefits of the goods being sold to a particular segment of the market.

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  • Trend Mapping

    Trend Mapping is the process of graphically illustrating the key trends affecting the market in which a business operates. A Trend Map is a tool designed to help individuals increase their knowledge of the relevant context, external developments, and changes over time relevant to the market and the business’s products and services in that market.

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  • Value Proposition

    A Value Proposition is a strategic statement that defines the customer segments a company intends to target, the customer needs it intends to serve, and how it will do so competitively and profitably.

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Human Resources - Best Practice Tools & Templates

  • Career Planning

    Career Planning is an ongoing process of structured self-analysis in order to identify career objectives, marketable skills, strengths and weaknesses.

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  • Change Management

    Change Management is the process of creating a plan for preparing and supporting employees and teams through organizational change, including the process of rolling out the change. As a business process, Change Management often includes redirecting the use of resources, re-engineering processes, creating new organizational structures, and reallocating budgets to better support the future direction of the organization.

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  • Communication Management

    Communication Management is the oversight of all channels of communication within an organization.

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  • Competency-Based Interviewing

    Competency Based Interviewing is a style of interviewing used to determine an applicant’s ability to handle certain situations. Most questions in this type of interview require the candidate to provide specific examples of how they’ve responded to difficult situations in the past.

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  • Critical Incidents

    There are several different types of Critical Incidents. A Critical Incident can be either a single traumatic event such as a life threatening emergency or violent event, or a series of repeated experiences which have negatively impacted a person over time. A Critical Incident can also be an event which made you question your values, beliefs, attitude or behavior, and has had a significant impact on your personal and professional outlook.

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  • Culture Mapping

    Culture Mapping is a process an organization goes through to “map out” the culture within its organization. Typically a “Culture Mapping Team” collects data and information that sheds light on the norms, values and other factors that are often being enhanced, intentionally or unintentionally, by management.

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  • Delphi Method

    The Delphi Method is a structured communication technique in which respondents are asked questions in two or more rounds. After each round, the respondents are encouraged to revise their original answers after seeing how the others responded. During this process, a consensus is reached.

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  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (DEI)

    The term DE&I refers to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. Diverse perspectives foster diverse thinking and help businesses address challenges in creative ways. Equitable treatment of others makes the entire workforce feel valued, while having inclusive policies in place ensures that resources are distributed to those that need them.

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  • Employee Engagement Surveys

    An Employee Engagement Survey is a survey created to measure employee engagement and opinions in order to maximize productivity, innovation, retention and management effectiveness.

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  • Executive & Leadership Coaching

    Executive & Leadership Coaches are consultants who are brought in to act as mentors to executives within an organization. They fulfill various roles for Executives and their direct reports, including coach, educator, guide, confidant and challenger. The goal is the overall development of the executive in order to improve his or her leadership skills.

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  • Growth Mindset

    A Growth Mindset is a particular way of thinking that involves believing that one is not born with a fixed amount of intelligence but rather their intelligence grows over time through hard work and learning from others.

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  • Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory

    Herzberg’s Two-Factor Theory proposes that there are two categories of job characteristics, one of which is consistently related to job satisfaction (called motivation factors) and one related job dissatisfaction (called hygiene factors).

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  • Job Analysis

    Job Analysis is the process used to determine in detail the particular job duties and requirements as well as the degree of importance of these duties for a specific job. The job analysis is then used to create a job description.

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  • Job Description

    A Job Description is the result of doing a job analysis, and which lays out specific duties and responsibilities related to a job. The job description defines the job as related to other jobs in the organization, the lines of communication which need to be followed, and the job title to which the job reports.

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  • Learning and Growth Perspective

    The Learning and Growth Perspective is a part of the balanced scorecard that refers to intangible assets (e.g., employee skills and abilities) that are required to maintain internal processes in the organization.

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  • Mentoring

    Mentoring is the act of providing guidance in the workplace to a less-experienced employee, called a mentee. A mentor may either be another employee of the company or a professional from outside of the company. The mentor is a role model who shares knowledge and advice to help the employee grow professionally.

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  • Performance Management

    Performance Management is a process in which managers and employees work together to plan, monitor and review an employee’s work objectives and overall contribution to the organization.

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  • RACI

    RACI is an acronym for Responsible, Accountable, Consulted and Informed. RACI Charts or the RACI Matrix are tools for outlining roles and responsibilities within a team or organization to ensure that nothing falls through the cracks.

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  • Resource Breakdown Structures (RBS)

    Resource Breakdown Structures is a hierarchical list of resources related by function and resource type that is used to facilitate planning and controlling of project work.

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  • Retirement Index

    A Retirement Index is an age-based index designed to help future retirees measure retirement readiness and plan for future income goals.

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  • Skills Requirement Checklist

    A Skills Requirement Checklist is a tool for employees and potential employees which lists the skills needed to perform a specific job, and the level of competency required of each skill.

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  • Stakeholder Analysis

    A Stakeholder Analysis is a report which identifies each stakeholder’s level of involvement in a project and how that involvement can influence the project’s overall success. Depending on the result of the analysis, a project manager may adjust the parameters of a project or limit a stakeholder’s involvement, and therefore, his or her influence over a project.

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  • Workday Task Analysis

    A Workday Task Analysis is the process of learning about workers by observing them in action, in order to understand in detail how they perform their tasks and achieve their intended goals.

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Manufacturing & Operations - Best Practice Tools & Templates

  • 5 S System

    The 5 S System is an essential Lean efficiency process consisting of 5 steps that are based on the following Japanese terms:

    1. Seiri – Sort
    2. Seiton – Set
    3. Seiso – Shine
    4. Seiketsu – Standardize
    5. Shitsuke – Sustain

    The purpose of the process is to ensure the physical space a business occupies remains well-organized, easy to navigate, and conducive to productivity. Each “S” represents a different step towards creating a safe, efficient, and clean work area, which helps increase employee satisfaction and quality and value for customers.

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  • Brainstorming

    Brainstorming is the creation and listing of ideas by one or more individuals in order to find a solution to a problem or generate ideas for a future business opportunity.  Also known as “Idea Generation” brainstorming is a common practice in marketing, innovation, design thinking, Six Sigma and other quality management processes.

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  • Business Process Re-engineering

    Business Process Reengineering (BPR) entails reimagining and redesigning a company’s essential business processes, systems, and structures in order to increase value for customers.

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  • Gemba Walk

    The Gemba Walk was developed by Toyota as a way to eliminate waste from their production operations. It is focused on implementing consistent process change and requires managers and executives to visit the production floor and see in person how a specific operation is done.

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  • House of Lean

    House of Lean refers to the implementation of Lean Methodologies into a company. It is an analogy that refers to building a house – in order to be built properly, lean strategies must be done in a proper order to be successful.

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  • House of Quality

    House of Quality is an integral part of Quality Function Deployment and consists of a planning process and matrix tool (resembling a house) that places customer needs and desires side-by-side with product manufacturing and design elements, in order to illustrate the extent to which product development is based on the voice of the customer.

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  • Huddle Boards

    A Huddle Board is a tool for visualizing the work and workflow of a team or organization. Huddle Boards are most often physical boards like a whiteboard which include “cards” or “post its” to show status, progress and issues related to a project or business initiative.

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  • Just in Time (JIT)

    Just in Time is a lean production management system and philosophy in which inventory and supplies are ordered and received only when they are needed, allowing companies to significantly reduce stock inventory, costs and space requirements, and increase return on investment. It originated out of Toyota’s production system in the 1970s.

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  • Kaizen

    Kaizen is a general continuous improvement philosophy that seeks to eliminate waste, inefficiency, and improve quality and productivity on an incremental basis. It is found within a wide variety of process improvement methods at the organizational, team, and individual level.

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  • Kanban Boards

    A Kanban Board is a tool for visualizing and optimizing work and workflow. Typically it is a physical board like a whiteboard, though it can also be an online tool, which uses “cards” on a “board” to show status, progress and issues related to a project or business initiative.

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  • Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

    Key Performance Indicators (also known as KPIs) help measure the overall performance and success of an organization. Many companies use KPIs across departments to measure the success of specific groups and the organization as a whole. In addition, Key Performance Indicators are a helpful tool in decision-making since they create visibility into the measurable success factors of an organization. KPIs can also be used to understand where a team, department or organization stands with respect to the implementation of its strategies, goals and projects.

  • Leading & Lagging Indicators

    Leading and Lagging Indicators are two types of measurements used when assessing performance in a business or organization. The difference between the two is that a leading indicator can influence change and a lagging indicator records only what has happened in the past.

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  • Lean Manufacturing

    Lean Manufacturing is focused on efforts to reduce waste, improve quality and ultimately make the customer happy. It also highlights the importance of reducing waste, which is defined as unnecessary work which does not add value to the product.

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  • Objectives & Key Results (OKRs)

    OKRs is an acronym for “Objectives and Key Results” and is a popular, frequently used tool for goal-setting to help teams reach for and measure progress in their most ambitious projects.

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  • Operational Performance Management

    Operational Performance Management (OPM) is the alignment of all departments within an organization to ensure that they are working together to achieve a common set of business goals. This includes all activities required to keep a business running productively across the organization.

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  • Outsourcing Decision-Matrix

    An Outsourcing Decision Matrix is a tool used to identify which business processes and operations are worth outsourcing, with the goal of reducing costs, creating efficiency, and deploying more resources towards innovation.

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  • Performance-Based Budgeting

    Performance-Based Budgeting is a method of developing budgets based on the relationship between program funding levels and expected results from that program. The performance-based budgeting process is a tool that program administrators can use to manage more cost-efficient and effective budgetary funding.

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  • QDIP Board

    A QDIP Board is a bulletin board hung in a process or production area which quickly conveys how manufacturing is performing in 4 key areas. Specifically, they are Quality, Delivery, Inventory and Productivity.

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  • RATER Model

    The RATER Model is a tool for evaluating the quality of your company’s services. It is an acronym that stands for Reliability, Assurance, Tangibles, Empathy, and Responsiveness, each of which is a different dimension against which the quality of your service provision is assessed.

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  • Six Sigma

    Six Sigma is a methodology for decreasing variation in business processes, which leads to a reduction in defects, higher return on investment, employee and customer satisfaction, and quality of products and services.

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  • SQDC Board

    An SQDC Board is a bulletin board hung in a process or production area which quickly conveys how manufacturing is performing in 4 key areas. Specifically, they are Safety, Quality, Delivery, and Cost.

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  • SQDCM Board

    An SQDC Board is a bulletin board hung in a process or production area which quickly conveys how manufacturing is performing in 4 key areas. Specifically, they are Safety, Quality, Delivery, Cost and Morale.

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  • Supplier Relationship Management (SRM)

    Supplier Relationship Management (SRM) is the systematic process and approach a business takes to managing relationships with all of its suppliers that ensures all processes and interactions between the business and suppliers are effective and efficient.

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  • Theory of Constraints (TOC)

    The Theory of Constraints is a methodological approach for isolating the most significant barrier or bottleneck in a process and then eliminating it in a systematic fashion.

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  • Total Quality Management (TQM)

    Total Quality Management is a management philosophy and approach that promotes the importance of continuous improvement in all business processes and functions. TQM seeks to engage all employees in creating an organizational culture characterized by the unremitting pursuit of excellence in delivering high-quality products, services, and customer service.

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  • Value Stream Mapping

    Value Stream Mapping is a Lean process of graphically illustrating the movement of materials and information through an organization from supplier to the customer. The purpose is to create a map of the current state of your organization’s supply chain to identify bottlenecks, inefficiencies, or buildup of inventory and take corrective action.

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  • Zero Defects

    Zero Defects is a management philosophy that emphasizes doing things right the first time. It is not a prescriptive, step-by-step initiative or program, but rather a mindset and cultural norm that refuses to tolerate product defects, the goal being to increase profit and customer satisfaction.

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Innovation & Product Development - Best Practice Tools & Templates

  • 70-20-10 Rule

    The 70-20-10 Rule is a strategy for determining how to allocate time and resources in order to make a successful innovation. Generally, the rule helps organizational stakeholders determine if they should make high risk/high reward innovations or improve upon existing products or services.

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  • Agile Innovation Process

    The Agile Innovation Processes is a team-based methodology for constantly adapting to changing business circumstances and conditions. The overarching goal of agile innovation is to develop a product or service that changes the market, forcing competitors to adapt or exit as a market player. In order to accomplish this goal, agile innovation processes involve splitting up larger projects into simpler, more manageable tasks and continuously reassessing the strategies for completing them.

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  • Brainstorming

    Brainstorming is the creation and listing of ideas by one or more individuals in order to find a solution to a problem or generate ideas for a future business opportunity.  Also known as “Idea Generation” brainstorming is a common practice in marketing, innovation, design thinking, Six Sigma and other quality management processes.

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  • Business Case Development

    A Business Case clearly outlines the fundamental reason for why an organization should engage in a particular project or task. They can either be formally or informally presented to top-level management or other relevant stakeholders. Generally, the team creating the business case for a project or task should aim to argue that whatever resources (e.g., money, time, talent, etc.) need to be expended for a project are being requested in order to fulfill a business necessity.

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  • Business Model Canvas

    The Business Model Canvas is a template for developing a new business model or clarifying the elements of an existing business model. It is a “canvas” or chart that describes a firm’s value proposition, infrastructure, partnerships, value proposition, customers, finances and other strategic and operational dimensions of the business.

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  • Concept Development

    Concept Development is the starting point for a business idea. It includes the type of service or product, the target customer demographic, and describes what is unique about it that will give this idea a competitive advantage. The process of Concept Development results in a portfolio of business concepts that can be prioritized and then used to develop a business plan.

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  • Concept Screening

    Concept Screening is a process that an organization can use to narrow down the number of ideas that are commonly generated for a new product or service. In order to ensure that the strongest ideas are selected for further development, they need to be screened against certain criteria.

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  • Concept Testing

    Concept Testing is the process of using surveys, interviews, or other means to test consumer acceptance of a new product idea prior to introducing a new product to the market.

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  • Context Canvas

    A Context Canvas is used to develop a deep sense of the environment in which a product or service is being created. Specifically, this tool can be used to guide thinking about what is happening in the organization and the broader world that might affect the business in the future.

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  • Crossing the Chasm

    The chasm is the space between the vision of the innovative product or service and the early segment of the market that will purchase the product. Crossing the Chasm involves taking steps in order to reconcile the discrepancy between the visionaries’ desire to be cutting edge in order to attain a competitive advantage and the desire of the early market to have an improved version of an existing product or service.

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  • Crowdsourcing

    Crowdsourcing is a method for using an organization’s entire “crowd” of employees, customers, business partners and other relevant stakeholders to generate new ideas and come up with solutions to business challenges.

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  • Customer Empathy Map

    A Customer Empathy Map is a strategic tool that is used to develop a thorough understanding of the customer or client who will be using a new product or service. More specifically, an empathy map forces individuals who are part of innovation or marketing teams to consider customer attitudes towards the product or service and their behavioral response to it.

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  • Customer Problem Statements

    A Customer Problem Statement is a detailed description of an issue that needs to be addressed by a problem-solving team. It is written to focus the team at the beginning, keep the team on track during the innovation project, and to confirm that the team delivered an appropriate solution that addresses a real customer need at the end of the project.

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  • Design Thinking

    Design Thinking is a human-centered approach to problem-solving used to create new and innovative ideas for business. Design Thinking includes a mindset focused on discovering people’s problems and challenges, and then using those to develop practical solutions to address them.

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  • Disruptive Innovation

    A Disruptive Innovation is one that uses new technologies or business models to make existing products and services accessible to the market. To be considered disruptive, the product or service should be made more affordable, targeted to a less profitable or untapped segment of the market, or benefit all of the parties in a network or business model in a new way.

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  • Empathy Interviews

    An Empathy Interview is an open-ended conversation between two or more people with the intention of uncovering information motivations, thoughts and feelings so that innovative products and services can be created to address problems and jobs-to-be-done.

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  • Ethnographic Research

    Ethnographic Research is an information gathering method for obtaining data about people’s needs, desires and preferences. In business, this information is typically part of the Design Thinking process used when creating a new product or service.

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  • Experiment Canvas

    An Experiment Canvas is a way to lay out all of the risk factors and key assumptions being made about a potential new product or service being developed. A useful canvas will have space to list the assumption under scrutiny as well as a way to test it and measure the results.

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  • Innovation Funnel Management Process

    An Innovation Funnel Management Process is the approach used to narrow down ideas for an innovation process or project into a feasible and realistic plan of action. The general process of the innovation funnel consists of generating a large number of possible ideas, a handful of which are then fine-tuned and converted into formal development plans, thus creating a “funnel shape.”

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  • Innovation Horizons Model

    The Innovation Horizons Model, also called the three horizons model, is a framework that organizations can use to identify areas for innovation and improvement without losing sight of current performance. This model is useful for driving innovation while preventing the types of organizational stagnation seen in many mature companies.

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  • Innovation Matrix

    An Innovation Matrix is a way to visualize the different dimensions that exist for creating a new product or service. The matrix can include various variables, but usually two variables are used: Competence (i.e., the ability within the company to come up with and execute an innovation) and Commitment (i.e., how important the innovation is to the organization).

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  • Innovation Roadmap

    An Innovation Roadmap is a visual depiction of the steps to be taken to achieve a strategic goal driven by innovation. As a strategic tool, an Innovation Roadmap lays out the specific actions that should be implemented over time to create new products, services, or business models.

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  • Jobs to be Done

    Jobs to be Done is best described as a perspective through which new product ideas can be evaluated for usefulness and viability. Understanding your customers’ Jobs to be Done helps determine what specific needs, pain points, or problems to focus on during the innovation process.

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  • Lean Startup

    Lean Startup is a methodology for developing new businesses and products with the goal of shortening product development cycles with frequent use of prospective customer contact, learning, and iteration. The Lean Start-up approach is most often used by early-stage startups, but more and more corporate ventures and innovation teams use the approach, tools, and templates to test and validate new business concepts.

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  • Listening Hats

    Listening Hats (also known as Six Thinking Hats) is a strategic tool that can be used while generating ideas for a new product or service. This tool is especially useful because it forces the individuals on the innovation team to consider options from a completely different perspective from which they normally would. Additionally, in a group setting, the Listening Hats tool allows every member of the team to view each option from many different perspectives at the same time.

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  • Minimum Viable Product (MVP)

    A Minimum Viable Product (also known as an MVP) is any early product that meets the minimum standards to be able to be shared with customers and other stakeholders for the purpose of collecting feedback and test assumptions.

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  • Open Innovation Process

    An Open Innovation Process emphasizes the use of external ideas and approaches to create and market new products and forces your innovation team to deliberately gather external insight from suppliers, partners, distributors, think tanks, and other external sources of information and technology. The method differs from those that came before, because it recognizes that the boundaries between the organization and others within the industry are more flexible, which, if used properly, create more impactful products or services.

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  • Outcome Driven Innovation

    Outcome Driven Innovation is a strategy for creating an innovation centered around fulfilling a customer need. The success of the innovation is dictated by customer-defined metrics and therefore it becomes critical to understand how the client measures value.

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  • Painstorming

    Painstorming is a method that is used to discover the real factors that underlie new opportunities for an organization. More specifically, Painstorming is a more targeted form of brainstorming that allows the innovation team to critically think about the ails or problems facing an industry, the business climate, the client base, or a particular product or service.

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  • Phases & Gates Innovation Process

    The Phases & Gates Innovation Process is a technique for innovation management in which a new initiative is divided into specific phases separated by decision points along the way.

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  • Rapid Prototyping

    Rapid Prototyping is a process for quickly creating mock-ups, models, or renderings of a product, service, process, or business model.

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  • Saturate and Group

    Saturate and Group is part of the innovation design thinking process in which the designers of a product or service create a big collage of observations, insights gleaned from stakeholder interviews or other interactions, personal experiences, organizational data, notes and drawings about a specific topic or opportunity.

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  • SCAMPER

    SCAMPER is an acronym that is used to help prompt creative ideas for improving existing products or services or creating new innovations. The letters in SCAMPER stand for substitute, combine, adapt, modify, put to another use, eliminate, and reverse. Each letter is associated with a string of questions that can be asked about existing products to discover methods of improvement or entirely new opportunities.

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  • S-Curve Mapping

    S-Curve Mapping is the process used to identify the different phases of evolution of a product, services, business process to identify innovation opportunities to competitive advantage. S-curve maps plot product or industry performance along the axes of time and performance. The model can be used to determine how mature and established an organization is within the industry or how well-developed the industry is itself.

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  • Startup Innovation Management

    Startup Innovation Management is a systematic process used by established companies to identify and work with startups, usually as part of a broader “open innovation” strategy.

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  • Technology Life Cycle

    The Technology Life Cycle Model shows the journey a technology takes, from birth to eventual death and the stages in between. Understanding the Technology Life Cycle helps companies predict when they will be able to recover the investment they put into development, and when to plan for new projects.

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  • Technology Scouting

    Technology Scouting is a strategic process that serves to accomplish three goals: (1) identifying new technologies, (2) acquiring information about new technologies for the organization and (3) acquiring these new technologies for the organization.

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  • Teece’s Win-Lose Innovation Model

    Teece’s Win-Lose Innovation Model describes the steps that organizations can take to ensure that they actually profit from their innovative products and services before competition replicates the product and pulls ahead in bottom-line performance. This model focuses on how an organization can obtain the proper legal protection to prevent this scenario from occurring.

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  • Value Proposition Canvas

    A Value Proposition Canvas is used to ensure that the product or service being created is centered around customer wants and needs. Specifically, this tool outlines what the customer expects to gain from the product or service, any negative experiences they may have as a consequence of using the product or service and the tasks they hope to accomplish with the product or service.

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  • White Space Innovation

    White Space Innovation is the process of identifying and creating entirely new market opportunities outside of existing markets and business models. Specifically, White Space is defined to be the market or customer needs that have not yet been fulfilled by existing solutions but could be met through the creation of a new product or service.

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Project Planning & Management - Best Practice Tools & Templates

  • Action Item List

    An Action Item List is a simple tool for tracking tasks, owners of tasks, and the time frame that tasks need to be completed during a project.

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  • Agile Project Management

    Agile Project Management is a project management process in which each step of the project is broken into smaller sections or iterations. These iterations begin in the idea generation stage and continue through project completion.

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  • Benefits Realization Methodology

    The Benefits Realization Methodology is a solution to the problem of actually measuring how successful projects are by measuring their value to the company that uses them.

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  • Critical Chain Project Management

    Critical Chain Project Management is a project scheduling method that factors in any limitations in resources, individual tasks that are dependent on the completion of others and additional hindrances to project completion.

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  • Critical Path Chart

    A Critical Path Chart is a project management tool that can be used with any project containing interdependent tasks, actions, or activities.

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  • Critical Path Method

    Critical Path Method (CPM) Project Management is a step-by-step project management process in which the project is split into the most critical, smaller tasks that progress from idea generation to project completion.

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  • Event Chain Methodology

    Event Chain Methodology is an uncertainty modeling and scheduling technique that is focused on identifying and managing events and the relationship between them (event chains) that affect project schedules.

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  • Extreme Project Management

    Extreme Project Management is a planning method used to manage unusual or difficult projects. It is based on a flexible approach to management, because it focuses on a few details that outline the project, but leaves many details flexible to allow for changes and new information along the way.

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  • Gantt Chart

    A Gantt Chart is a project management tool that uses a bar chart format to lay out each activity required to complete a project.

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  • Integrated Project Management

    Integrated Project Management (IPM) involves coordinating all of the various resources and stakeholders that are involved in a project to make sure that each department is working consistently.

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  • Issue Tracker

    An Issue Tracker is a management tool for tracking incoming issues, often related to a customer support center or software development program.

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  • IT Roadmap

    An IT Roadmap is a strategic tool used to plot out at what stages and which technologies will be used to support and implement a new project. An IT Roadmap can be used to explain why a project is important and why the related technological support is required. Generally, an IT Roadmap is shared with the IT team, the operations team or senior leaders in the organization.

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  • Lean Project Management

    Lean Project Management is defined by the use of other lean concepts, such as lean innovation, lean manufacturing and lean thinking to project management. The main tenet of Lean Project Management is providing more value with less waste, which should result in higher quality at a reduced cost.

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  • Lean Six Sigma

    Lean Six Sigma is a combination of two well-known project management methods, Lean and Six Sigma. Lean Project Management streamlines manufacturing and service processes by eliminating waste, while Six Sigma efficiently reduces the occurrence of defective products, thereby reducing waste and increasing customer satisfaction.

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  • Plan of Intent (PoI)

    A Plan of Intent (PoI) is strategic document that outlines an organization’s planned and prioritized initiatives and projects. These initiatives typically align to the operational plan that supports the organization’s annual goals and objectives.

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  • Plan of Record (PoR)

    A Plan of Record (PoR) is an approved plan by senior leadership that illustrates an organization’s prioritized initiatives and projects. These initiatives should be in direct alignment with the operational plan that supports the organization’s annual goals and objectives.

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  • PMBOK Project Management Model

    The PMBOK Project Management Model is a set of accepted industry standards used by companies to manage projects which is documented in the Guide to Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), and uses 5 steps to successfully manage a project, specifically: initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing.

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  • PRINCE2 Project Management

    PRINCE2 stands for Projects in Controlled Environments. As the name would imply, PRINCE2 Project Management is a highly structured project method that involves breaking projects into small, easy to manage stages. The stages are determined based on how they fare in six different categories: scope, length of time, risk, quality, benefits, and cost.

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  • PRiSM Project Management

    PRiSM stands for Projects Integrating Sustainable Methods. Therefore, PRiSM Project Management is a sustainable method for project management, enabling organizations to complete their projects while integrating environmental sustainability, which would benefit both the organization and society at large.

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  • Process-Based Project Management

    Process-Based Project Management is a strategic and systematic management methodology which aligns all the objectives of a project with the overall mission and corporate values of a company. Each task is strategic and contributes to the achievement of the most crucial objectives of the company.

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  • Program Management

    Program Management consists of running an interrelated group of projects, called a program. Generally, programs are created with the intent of improving the organization’s current processes and policies or implementing change management. Additionally, Program Management can be used for technological innovations.

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  • Project Budgeting

    Project Budgeting is a project management tool that controls the cost of a project by researching all possible costs associated with a project and combining them to come up with a project budget.

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  • Project Charter

    A Project Charter lists the main goals of a project as well as a detailed plan for how to attain those goals. This detailed plan involves identifying the relevant stakeholders and determining the roles and responsibilities of each individual involved with the project.

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  • Project Dashboard

    A Project Dashboard provides an overall measurement of the current status of a project. It is usually presented in spreadsheet format and contains all the key performance indicators relevant to a specific project in one place so that project managers can instantly evaluate progress.

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  • Project Portfolio Management

    Project Portfolio Management (PPM) is a method utilized by project managers to determine what the value would be of investing time and other organizational resources in a particular project. Ultimately, PPM aims to establish the ideal combination of resources and tasks for a project that will promote the financial and procedural goals of an organization.

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  • Project Portfolio Timeline

    A Project Portfolio Timeline is a tool that can be used to visually plan a series of projects at the same time and provide a broad overview of all the projects happening in an organization at any given time.

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  • Project Risk Management

    Project Risk Management is an approach to project management that helps reduce the overall risk of a project by researching all possible costs and major risk factors associated with the successful execution of the project, including ensuring it remains within the defined budget.

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  • Project Rollup

    A Project Rollup provides an overall glimpse of the current status of a multitude of individual projects. It is usually presented as a dashboard or in spreadsheet format and shows a topline view of projects so that project managers and stakeholders can instantly evaluate their progress.

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  • Project Schedule

    A Project Schedule is a project management tool that outlines the work that needs to be performed for a project, the resources needed, and the timeframe during which completion is expected.

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  • Project Scorecard

    Project Scorecard can be used to assess the risk and complexity of a project. A scorecard also indicates how efficient and successful the project is based on various criteria like return on investment or cost containment.

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  • Project Timeline

    A Project Timeline is a display of a list of events in chronological order. It is usually shown as a graphic with a horizontal bar depicting events and related dates.

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  • Project Tracker

    A Project Tracker is a tool to help project managers track a project from beginning to end. It itemizes specific jobs within a project by effectively managing work and resources required to complete a project. When each of the tasks is completed, it is checked off and the team can move on.

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  • Requirements Breakdown Structure

    A Requirements Breakdown Structure (RBS) is a hierarchical, usually tree-shaped description of all project requirements which must be present in the end product in order to deliver the expected business value.

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  • Scrum Project Management

    Scrum Project Management is a type of agile project management that involves leading a team from one sprint to the next using time-bound deliverables and action plans.

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  • Skills Requirement Checklist

    Skills Requirement Checklist is a tool for employees and potential employees which lists the skills needed to perform a specific job, and the level of competency required of each skill.

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  • Task List

    A Task List is a prioritized list of all the tasks and responsibilities that need to be performed for a job or role on a team. The list typically shows everything that needs to be done in the order in which it needs to be completed.

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  • Time Card

    A Time Card is a tool for employees to track their hours worked. It is either filled in by hand or stamped electronically by a time clock.

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  • To Do List

    A To Do List is a prioritized list of all the tasks and responsibilities that need to be performed for a job. The list shows everything that needs to be done in the order in which it needs to be completed.

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  • Waterfall Project Management

    Waterfall Project Management is modeled after its name, in that the steps in a project flow logically from top to bottom, in a sequential, linear order like a waterfall. No phase can begin until the prior phase has been completed.

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  • Work Breakdown Structure

    A Work Breakdown Structure is a tool used in project management showing a breakdown of a project into smaller, more manageable components.

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Change Management - Best Practice Tools & Templates

  • AIM Accelerated Implementation Methodology

    AIM Accelerated Implementation Methodology is a system used to help organizations get the most out of their change program. The framework includes a mix of organizational theory and practical tools for creating and measuring the success of long-term changes. The purpose of this framework is to create an easy-to-follow process for implementing large and small scale change that is easily translatable to any kind of organization.

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  • Beckhard & Harris Change Process

    The Beckhard & Harris Change Process is a five step approach that assists organizations in identifying and implementing change. These five steps include internal organizational analysis, identifying the necessity of change, conducting a gap analysis, action planning, and managing the transition. This purpose of this process is to clearly delineate the steps needed to accomplish successful change.

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  • Boston Consulting Group (BCG) Change Delta

    The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) Change Delta is a change management approach that directs organizations to invest the majority of their resources into the most important aspects of the change, which are executional certainty, sponsorship, governance and program management office (PMO), enabled leaders, and an engaged organization.

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  • Brainstorming

    Brainstorming is the creation and listing of ideas by one or more individuals in order to find a solution to a problem or generate ideas for a future business opportunity.  Also known as “Idea Generation” brainstorming is a common practice in marketing, innovation, design thinking, Six Sigma and other quality management processes.

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  • Bridges' Leading Transition Model

    Bridges’ Leading Transition Model is a change management model that describes the stages of transition that individuals go through when they experience change. These stages are ending, losing and letting go, the neutral zone, and the new beginning. This model primarily focuses on transition and provides managers with guidance on how to help individuals navigate through the transition stages so that they are ultimately more accepting of the change.

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  • Burning Platform

    A Burning Platform is a metaphor used to explain the necessity of change despite the fear of the unknown consequences. This metaphor was derived from the fatal explosion of an oil drilling platform in which one survivor had to chose to jump into a sea of burning oil rather than burn on the platform. This metaphor serves to describe a situation in which action (i.e., costly change) is required and maintenance of the status quo is no longer an option as doing so would be even more harmful.

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  • Case for Change

    The Case for Change Template is a tool that provides the Change Manager with one place to capture all the reasons a change needs to occur. Information to complete this template will be pulled from existing documents: Scope of Work, Project Charter, and relevant background information provided by the sponsor.

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  • Change Fatigue

    Change Fatigue happens when the purpose and outcomes of an organizational change are poorly communicated, creating a sense of frustration and exhaustion. This is especially true when the result that is promised doesn’t happen or is severely delayed. Throughout the change management process, employees can become overwhelmed with work and confused about priorities. If there is an ongoing, constant feeling of urgency, employees will tend to burn out since sustaining urgent energy and motivation is difficult over the long-term.

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  • Change Management Curve

    A Change Curve is a tool used to understand the change management process and the stages that underlie it. Since most people experience the phase of change in similar ways, a Change Curve Model can help one understand how to provide support during the change management process.

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  • Change Management Impact Analysis

    A Change Management Impact Analysis is a method that is used to identify relevant stakeholders in a change management process as well as the risks and benefits that the change management initiative provides to them. Based on this information, your team will be able to discern the impact that the change management program has on key individuals.

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  • Change Management Maturity Model

    The Change Management Maturity Model describes the level of ability that an organization has to change. The maturity model provides a change management approach that is specifically tailored to the organization’s change capability level. The levels range from 1 (no change capability) to 5 (competency to change). As the levels increase, specific strategies outline how to handle different groups of individuals within the organization who are affected by the change.

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  • Change Management Levers

    Change Management Levers are a set of change management instruments that, when used in combination, aid in producing successful change. The five levers are: communication plan, sponsorship roadmap, coaching, teaching and resistance management plan.

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  • Change Management Plan

    A Change Management Plan details the “planning” phase that is present in the majority of change management models (e.g., Kotter’s 8-Step Change Management Process). More specifically, a Change Management Plan strategically lays out factors such as the budget, timeline, breadth, communication plan and needed and/or required resources for the change process. A detailed plan, especially for a complex change management initiative can more easily be communicated to others, including key stakeholders and employees.

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  • Change Management Roadmap

    A Change Management Roadmap is a method used to systematically plan an effective strategy for organizational change. A roadmap can be applied to any change management initiative (e.g., product development, production, operations, etc.). Creating a “roadmap” is typically best utilized after a change management team has identified and garnered support for the need to implement a change initiative. The roadmap is used to create a feasible and efficient plan for execution. Having an effective and structured change management process is necessary to ensure that your organization remains competitive in its current markets. Additionally, change management efforts that have a clearly defined structure with a phased rollout are more likely to be successfully executed.

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  • Change Proposal

    A Change Proposal is a document used to make official, formal suggestions as to how an organization or project should be changed. It should specify the reason behind the change, how exactly the change will be executed and resulting benefits of the change.

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  • Change Readiness Assessment

    A Change Readiness Assessment is an analysis of the levels of the organization undergoing change, conducted so that key change makers are aware of what adjustments to attitudes need to be made or what resources need to be acquired for prosperous change to occur. More specifically, each level of the organization is assessed for how prepared it is to handle different magnitudes of change. The purpose of a Change Readiness Assessment is to make these determinations of preparedness.

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  • Change Resistance Management Plan

    A Change Resistance Management Plan is a method that can be utilized if and when your team encounters resistance to its change management efforts. Individuals within the organization can be change-averse because uncertainty associated with change creates fear and anxiety, which people typically try to avoid. In addition to these emotional experiences, employees are concerned with the manner in which these initiatives will influence their work, salary, and personal life.

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  • Change Risk Assessment

    A Change Risk Assessment is one possible method to evaluate the risk associated with a particular change management initiative. Change Risk Assessments prevent the organization from being negatively affected by damaging aspects of a change program or changes that prevent individuals from doing their jobs.

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  • Change Success Metrics

    Change Success Metrics are the measures that are needed to track the people side of a change management initiative. These metrics are more frequently becoming mandatory in many organizations to indicate the success of a change initiative to project sponsors, company leadership and project personnel, among others.

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  • Communications Plan

    A Communications Plan outlines the ideas that will be communicated during a change management program. The goal of a communication plan is to clearly delineate the aspects of the change program that need to be shared with key stakeholders.

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  • Core Values

    The Core Values of a company are the fundamental beliefs upon which a business is based. They are principals which are relied upon to steer interactions both internally among employees and externally with customers.

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  • Deming Change Cycle

    The Deming Change Cycle is a method that is used to improve the quality of the organization’s products. Specifically, the cycle provides a systematic plan for improving the quality of the products that meets the needs of the industry as well as minimizes any errors or product defects.

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  • EASIER Change Management Model

    The EASIER Change Management Model is a framework that acts as a checklist to ensure successful change. EASIER is an acronym for these steps: Envision, Activate, Support, Implement, Ensure, and Recognize.

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  • Employee Engagement Plan

    An Employee Engagement Plan is a plan set in place in order to increase the emotional investment employees make in their organizations. The higher the passion, involvement and level of motivation they bring to work, the more engaged they will be. As a result, employees will identify with and are more likely to achieve the organization’s goals.

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  • Feedback Capture Grid

    Feedback Capture Grid is a way of organizing and summarizing feedback on a product or service during a trial run. Specifically, all feedback is organized into what individuals like about the product or service, what needs to be changed, questions that still remain among the testers, and ideas to improve the innovation.

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  • Focus Groups

    Focus Groups are groups of individuals who are gathered to observe a new product or discuss a particular topic in order to give organizations a chance to preview customer reactions. They are also used to gauge employee reactions to an organization’s change program.

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  • GE Change Acceleration Process (CAP)

    The GE Change Acceleration Process (CAP) model was created out of research done by General Electric which resulted in the realization that even projects with a high degree of technical expertise, without consideration of cultural factors, will fail. It is interesting to note that the team used a multiplicative equation for this model: The Effectiveness (E) of any initiative is equal to the product of the Quality (Q) of the technical strategy and the Acceptance (A) of that strategy, (E=Q*A).

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  • Geert Hofstede's 6 Dimensions of Culture

    Psychologist Dr Geert Hofstede originally published his cultural dimensions model in the 1970s, based on his cross-cultural psychology research of people who worked for IBM in more than 50 countries. His original research included only four dimensions, but a fifth and sixth dimension were added later.

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  • Go-Live Planning

    A Go-Live Plan is the steps that should be taken before actually implementing a change program. Successful Go-Live Plans require preparation, specific action to be taken, a contingency plan in case one is needed, proper resources, and thorough consideration given to the risks associated with the change. The purpose of having a Go-Live Plan is to help ensure that the actual transition runs smoothly.

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  • Head, Heart and Hands Model

    The Head, Heart and Hands Model emphasizes the importance of appealing to the head, heart and hand of the other organizational members when initiating a change program. More specifically, the change management plan should include logic and analysis, a compelling reason for the necessity of the change and easy and practical suggestions for enacting the change.

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  • Kotter's 8-Step Change Model

    Kotter’s 8-Step Change Model is an eight step process that assists managers in implementing successful change programs in their organizations. The eight steps include: create urgency, form a powerful coalition, create a vision for change, communicate the vision, remove obstacles, create short-term wins, build on the change, and anchor the changes in corporate culture.

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  • Kubler Ross Change Curve

    The Kubler Ross Change Curve is a model that describes the stages of individuals’ responses to organizational change. There are five stages of the change curve. The purpose of this model is to assist the organization in gauging how individual employees will respond to the change at different stages.

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  • Lewin's Change Management Model

    Lewin’s Change Management Model is a framework that describes that the reason for change must be fully understood by employees before any change can actually occur. This is because individuals will be more motivated to enact a change when they are aware of why it is necessary. Lewin’s Change Management Model lays out three steps – Unfreeze, Change and Refreeze – which help to ensure that a change will be maintained in the future.

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  • Maurer's 3 Levels of Resistance to Change

    Change Management expert Rick Maurer has outlined the three levels of change resistance in organizations and how to work through them in order for successful change to occur. Resistance is usually a reaction to the way a change effort is being led. If you can find the root cause of the resistance, you can usually overcome it.

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  • Nudge Change Model

    The Nudge Change Model is derived from Nudge Theory, which provides a framework for understanding how and helping people to make decisions by reducing any influences that might discourage quality decision-making.

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  • People Centered Implementation

    People Centered Implementation, known by the acronym PCI, is a change management strategy which focuses on considering and accommodating the human assets which will be responsible for executing the change.

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  • Performance Support

    Performance Support is a simple, easily understood electronic or paper material that aids employees in refreshing or enhancing new skills acquired during an organizational change program. Performance Support is used as a supplement to training created for the change program. The purpose of Performance Support is to provide references for employees to use when implementing new skills, solving unfamiliar problems, or modifying their work practices.

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  • Process Mapping

    Process Mapping is a roadmap created to illustrate the path the organization will follow as it implements its change program. A process map includes the course of action to be taken and the events that will transpire at each step so the organization can reach its goals. A process map provides a visualization of what organizations need to do to create successful change.

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  • Sponsor Roadmap

    A Sponsor Roadmap details the actions that organizational executives need to take to fulfill their role in the change management process. The roadmap is very important to making sure that your team gets the necessary support from senior leadership to ensure a successful implementation of the change management program.

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  • Stakeholder Analysis

    A Stakeholder Analysis is a strategy used to identify the individuals in your organization who will and will not support your change efforts. In addition, a stakeholder analysis allows your team to determine how to treat these individuals, and what actions to take with them during the change process. This analysis is useful to ensure that your change management program can be implemented successfully sine these actions help minimize resistance to change.

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  • Stakeholder Interviews

    A Stakeholder Interview is a discussion conducted with high- or low-level stakeholders in the organization regarding the change program. These interviews provide a deeper sense of the budget, timeline, and objectives for the change program as well as the people involved in the organization and its competition. The purpose of the stakeholder interview is to help outside change-makers gain a better understanding of the organization and the way it operates as well as what the stakeholders hope to achieve with the change.

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  • Switch Change Framework

    The Switch Change Framework describes how to find a balance between the emotional and rational components of our decision-making behavior. It begins with the premise that our emotional and intuitive brain can sometimes overcome the rational decision-making side of the brain.

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  • User Acceptance Testing

    User Acceptance Testing, otherwise known as beta testing, is the final step in the change management process where a proposed strategy, technology implementation or product is tested with a group of individuals that are representative of the audience that will be affected by or utilize a new system. These “users” are typically individuals who are employees who volunteer or are requested to try out the new technology or service.

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  • VRIO Framework Model

    The VRIO Framework is a strategic method that can be used to evaluate an organization’s resources and capability to change. Resources can be both tangible or intangible goods that the organization produces or uses to make their products or services. VRIO is an acronym whose letters stand for value, rarity, imitability, and organization.

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  • What’s In It For Me (WIIFM)?

    What’s In It For Me (WIIFM) is the central question that employees are concerned with when faced with organizational change. Broadly, this inquiry encompasses a number of questions regarding how the change is going to affect employee’s daily routines in the workplace (e.g., Will they be working with different people? Will they require different knowledge to perform their job well? Will their job responsibilities be altered?) The reason employees ask this question is to better understand how the change will affect them so they can determine how to respond.

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Six Sigma - Best Practice Tools & Templates

  • A3 Report

    An A3 Report is a tool used by team leaders and managers to document a set of key data points and important information needed for ongoing progress checks and decision-making. 

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  • Action Plan

    An Action Plan Template provides managers and supervisors with an easy way of tracking the answers to some of the most important elements of a project or activity: the who, what and when.

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  • Audit Checklist

    The Audit Checklist provides guidelines for practitioners to identify elements of a process or specific items to be examined in the further understanding and following of procedures necessary for continuous monitoring and steady improvement.

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  • Black Belt Project Storyboard

    The Black Belt Project Storyboard should be used when you want to share best practices or learnings from a specific change management initiative or project to a wider audience within an organization or to a broader group of stakeholders.

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  • Black Belt Tollgate Checklist

    A Black Belt Tollgate Checklist is one of the tools of the trade of a Six Sigma project manager or practitioner. The Checklist outlines the deliverables for each phase of DMAIC and helps provide guidance on which deliverables and checks must be completed before moving on to the next phase.

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  • Box and Whisker Plot

    A Box and Whisker Plot is a graphical method for creating and displaying a specific data set. It is often referred to as a box plat or a box and whisker diagram. The diagram is most often used with historical data to provide an analysis of performance over time (for instance, with individual stocks).

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  • Cause and Effect Matrix

    Business leaders and managers using the Cause and Effect Matrix (also known as a C&E Matrix) will be better able to prioritize the Key Process Input Variables (KPIVs) based on Key Priorities of Customer Outputs (KPOVs). The matrix helps establish correlation between process input metrics and customer outputs during root cause analyses.

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  • Check Sheet Histogram Template

    The Check Sheet Histogram Template is a useful tool to help business leaders and managers track activities over a set period of time and to measure tasks, performance, errors, complaints, etc. in a way which enables thorough analysis of trends.

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  • DMAIC Checklist

    DMAIC stands for Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve and Control, and the DMAIC Checklist helps guide leaders to complete the DMAIC process. 

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  • DMAIC Roadmap

    The DMAIC Roadmap methodology is typically implemented when an organization reaches a certain level of organizational culture and experience to warrant it. Each of the steps must be mastered and completed in a particular order in order to get the most out of the DMAIC methodology. 

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  • DPO and DPMO Calculator

    The DPO and DPMO Calculator provides a tool to estimate the DPO rate and DPMO rate of any process or system within your organization.

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  • Eight Disciplines (8D)

    Eight Disciplines (8D) is a problem solving methodology and model designed to find the root cause of a particular problem within a business. It is most commonly used in the auto industry by quality engineers but has also been applied to other industries and sectors including retail, healthcare, finance, government and manufacturing.

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  • Eight (8) Wastes Checklist

    The Eight (8) Wastes Checklist is a tool used by managers and supervisors to help identify areas of waste within a business or a particular process. Data from the checklist is then used to determine where and how to eliminate that waste.

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  • Fishbone Diagram

    A Fishbone Diagram is considered one of half a dozen basic quality monitoring frameworks used to capture possible causes of a problem. The main purpose of a fishbone diagram is to help managers and leaders identify possible causes and effects for a specific problem.

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  • Five Whys Process

    The Five Whys Process provides business leaders and managers with a simple and easy to understand methods used in the Analyze phase of DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) within the Lean Six Sigma process.

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  • FMEA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis)

    The FMEA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) is a step-by-step approach first developed by the U.S. military in the 1940s to identify possible failures in design or errors in manufacturing processes. FMEA provides a systematic, proactive method for analyzing and evaluating processes to identify how they might fail and then weigh the impact of different failures.

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  • Implementation Plan

    An Implementation Plan provides business leaders and managers with a framework to create a summary of the strategy to be used in order to make a solution possible for a piloted project.

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  • Kano Model

    The Kano Model provides users with a method for analyzing customer expectations, needs, wants and requirements by diagramming them across 2 axes. One axis is total satisfaction with your output (be it a product, service or deliverable), while the other axis shows the extent to which you achieved your goals with the output.

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  • Management by Fact (MBF)

    Management by Fact (MBF) is a process designed to help managers and leaders guide and improve the quality of tasks and projects through a rigorous quality improvement methodology. The MBF process helps practitioners identify specific problems within a process, hypothesize as to possible root causes, and develop countermeasures to prevent roadblocks.

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  • Margin of Error Calculator

    Margin of Error is a critical calculation used to estimate how accurate specific assumptions are and how confident the user can be as to the correct outcome of those assumptions. The Margin of Error calculation allows business leaders and managers to assess how a sample of data relates to a larger population.

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  • MECE (Mutually Exclusive Collectively Exhaustive)

    The MECE (Mutually Exclusive Collectively Exhaustive) framework provides business leaders and managers with a way of dividing information up into elements that are “mutually exclusive” and “collectively exhaustive”. The MECE framework is famously used by McKinsey consultants to structure information and reduce complexity by avoiding overlaps while gathering a comprehensive collection of data points without leaving room for alternatives.

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  • Meeting and Project Roles Template

    In order to avoid wasting valuable time on team meetings which lead to no clear outcome, use the Meeting and Project Roles template. This template provides you with a simple structure and outline to identify members of a project team and their duties during regular team meetings.

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  • MTBF and MTTR Calculators

    MTBF and MTTR are two of the most important Key Performance Indicators for managers and business leaders to look at when trying to improve the reliability of a product, service or piece of machinery. They can be used independently but are even more useful when put together. MTBF stands for Mean Time Between Failures, and is the average length of time before a piece of machinery or a product breaks. MTTR is Mean Time to Repair, or the average length of time it takes to get a piece of machinery back up and running or repaired when it does break down.

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  • OEE Calculator

    OEE stands for Overall Equipment Effectiveness, and is generally considered to refer to a measurement in “Total Productive Maintenance” programs. The measure looks at effectiveness and efficiency of machinery or processes and is commonly referred to in reference to Lean Manufacturing.

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  • Opportunity Pipeline

    An Opportunity Pipeline provides business leaders and managers with a valuable source of insight and data on particular ideas, projects and initiatives being considered for investment.

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  • Pareto Chart

    A Pareto Chart is a tool used by business leaders to analyze data about the likelihood of certain problems occurring through the analysis of problem frequency and root causes.

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  • Process Control Plan

    Process Control Plan is a tool used to document and track the elements of quality control within a system in order to make sure that quality standards are upheld and maintained for a specific product, process or service. A Process Control Plan helps to formalize and document the system of control and quality control during a process.

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  • Project Prioritization Matrix

    Project Priority Matrix is a tool to help business leaders work out what the key priorities for a specific project should be. The tool can also be used to prioritize and select from multiple projects in order to prioritize and select which project among many should be pursued first.

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  • Project Purpose Worksheet

    A Project Purpose Worksheet provides a simple table for a business leader to outline their own responses to four simple questions related to the purpose of the project and the mission of the business overall.

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  • Project Schedule Worksheet

    A Project Schedule Worksheet provides a simple framework for a business leader or manager to use to track planned start and end dates for specific tasks that fall under a larger project alongside notes and current task status.

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  • Project Screener Worksheet

    A Project Screener Worksheet provides a simple framework for business leaders or managers to validate the premise of a project by asking four key questions designed to enable the creation of a draft goal statement.

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  • Project Selection Guide

    The Project Selection Guide is a tool used by business leaders and managers to assess whether or not a project should be pursued based on the value of potential improvements, overall meaningfulness to the business, and ability for the project to be managed effectively by the existing team.

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  • Pugh Matrix

    The Pugh Matrix is a diagram used to compare multiple product or solution designs and accurately determine which candidate will best meet a set of criteria based on business needs and customer demands.

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  • Quality Function Deployment (QFD)

    Quality Function Deployment (QFD) provides business leaders and managers with tools to determine what is needed to satisfy and delight their customers. The QFD methodology provides a system for listening to the voice of the customer and responding to the needs and expectations raised by your target audience.

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  • Sample Size Calculator

    A Sample Size Calculator allows you to determine the sample size within a population necessary to test in order to make an accurate assessment without surveying an entire population or testing every single individual within a certain set.

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  • SIPOC Analysis

    The SIPOC Analysis Template can be used by a business leader or manager to identify the relevant parts of a process improvement project before work begins. SIPOC Analysis is particularly helpful when defining a complex process that requires additional scoping, and it is typically carried out during the Measure phase of the Lean Six Sigma DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) process.

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  • Six Sigma Balanced Scorecard

    A Six Sigma Balanced Scorecard is a model that summarizes an organization’s high-level strategic goals, initiatives designed to reach those goals, and metrics, or key performance indicators, that monitor success over time.

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  • Standard Operating Procedure (SOP)

    A Standard Operating Procedure, or SOP, is a document or process outline that has been created to show operators how to carry out a specific task, process or activity. It can be delivered as a document, presentation, workflow document, or even a video.

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  • Takt Time Calculator

    In Six Sigma, Takt Time refers to the available time for production divided by the required units of production during the same period. Time available for production includes the total number of hours that employees work on production minus any breaks or meetings.

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  • Tree Diagram

    Tree Diagrams enable business leaders and managers to break down big ideas and concepts into finite levels of detail. The process of developing a Tree Diagram is most easily described as a way to systematically break down a complex process into its constituent parts.

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  • Voice of the Customer

    The Voice of the Customer Table is a template which helps business leaders and managers frame the inputs received through the process of carrying out a Voice of the Customer (VOC) exercise.

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  • X Matrix

    The X Matrix template consists of a single-page document that has guiding principles at its core and is surrounded by strategies, tactics, projects and measurement frameworks to support the successful implementation of those guiding principles.

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  • XY (Cause & Effect) Matrix

    The XY Matrix (or the Cause & Effect Matrix) is a six sigma tool which can be used to prioritize key inputs and simultaneously rank priorities of customer outputs. The XY Matrix tool is most frequently used to support the DMAIC “measure” phase to show the relationship between X (Cause) and Y (Effect) factors.

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Software Development - Best Practice Tools & Templates

  • Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) Management

    A Bug Log, also called a Bug Tracking System, is a typically a software application that keeps track of bugs and other issues in software development projects.

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  • Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) Management

    Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) Management is a process that aims to develop software with the lowest cost, highest quality, and in the shortest time.  It also includes detailed documentation for how to develop, extend, and maintain the software system. A Software Development Life Cycle involves several different stages, including requirements gathering, planning/designing, building, testing, and finally deployment.

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  • Software Development Planning

    Software Development Planning is a process that aims to improve software delivery predictability and includes requirements gathering, planning and designing the product, and often research and development into the areas that are unknowns or risks to the project.

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  • Software Technology Evaluation

    Software Technology Evaluation is a process used to determine the best internal or third party technology to use in a software development project. When conducting a Software Technology Evaluation to determine whether to build or buy technology for a software development project, a best practice is to conduct high level research to explore a wide variety of options, based upon criteria such as: Cost (to develop or purchase/license), Features, Maturity/Stability, and Support.

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  • Software Engineering Tools

    Software Engineering Tools are used to create disciplined software development and include software tools such as version control, coding standards, static code analysis, code reviews, bug tracking, continuous automated build processes, and automated testing.

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  • JIRA Dashboarding

    JIRA Dashboarding provides insight into current development status with development dashboards configured to display many different types of information about a given software product.

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